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Milele Safari ~ an Eternal Journey: Jan Hawke

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alias author Jan Hawke

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  Quote Jano Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: Milele Safari ~ an Eternal Journey: Jan Hawke
    Posted: 14 Jan 2014 at 11:49pm
This is a thread of the 'ta-dah!' persuasion in that I'm collecting reviews as they come in for my first novel, Milele Safari. To make things pretty here's the cover artwork first off...



And here's the first Amazon review by 'Pip' - 

Originally posted by pip

Not my typical sort of book to be honest but I'm glad I read outside my comfort zone. Story is beautifully crafted and drew me right in. The main characters are well drawn and in many ways you can feel what they are feeling giving a sense of authenticity to the story. For a story with such a dark central fulcrum it is actually quite uplifting I also felt like I was learning something about the character of Africa as I was reading. Some very interesting and informative footnotes throughout really help as well.
All in all a well written book and hopefully the first of many.

Embarrassed If you have read Milele Safari and want to review it here, please feel free to post away! 

If you've read these reviews and want to read Milele Safari... Star

The most valuable of all talents is that of never using two words when one
will do ~ Thomas Jefferson
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  Quote Jano Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 26 Jan 2014 at 10:41pm

Another one for me about to go up on Amazon - written by Ted Farrar, author of Dreamers, that I'm about to post a 5*review for when this wretched broadband connection lets me... probably tomorrow now though Wacko

Originally posted by Ted Farrar

Sophie Taylor has returned to Africa after a long absence, and is forced to confront the tragedies of her past – the murder of her fiancé and loss of her unborn daughter. Milele Safari records this spiritual journey of acceptance, healing and romance against the stunning, often savage and always unpredictable backdrop of Africa.

It is hard to believe this is Jan Hawke’s first novel – she is such an accomplished writer that you can almost taste the dust of Africa in your throat, picture the characters as if you’re sitting beside them around the campfire. The story takes you back and forth from past to present and back again, unflinchingly exploring the essence of Africa through Sophie’s experiences. Ultimately it’s a romance, but this is no Mills & Boon. It deserves no less than five stars because not only is it an engrossing story but seemingly accomplishes the impossible by revealing the soul of Africa, warts and all.

The most valuable of all talents is that of never using two words when one
will do ~ Thomas Jefferson
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  Quote Jano Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 25 Feb 2014 at 5:59pm
No apologies - double post here for the 2 latest reviews in on Milele! Tongue

First one is from a LinkedIn chum, Frank P Ryan successful author of non fiction (amongst which is Tuberculosis: The Forgotten Plague - US edition) and the bestselling fantasy series The Three Powers the 1st book of which, The Snowmelt River I've reviewed elsewhere in this forum.
 
Originally posted by FP Ryan - Amazon 4Star

The redemption of love and forgiveness over the brutality of genocide
This is a powerfully evocative book in which the fulcrum for the narrative is a violent scene taken from the kind of circumstances seen in the Rwandan massacre. The survivors’ lives are all affected in various ways. This leads to some excellent characterisations of Europeans and Africans caught up in the violence. An emotional rollercoaster, it dissects the brutal events of the massacre, and extrapolates to the subsequent cold assessment of police and doctors, nuns, local people, men and woman, who have contributed to the carnage or who have attempted to prevent or mollify it – sometimes at the cost of their lives. Then it probes deeper still, to the longer term personal implications and reactions, including those much further afield, back in England, and years later in Africa.
There are flashbacks to happier times, contrasting the horror to the tranquillity and beauty of daily life in Africa, and to the happiness of the people involved prior to the massacre. There’s a powerful love story, like a stream of hope, winding through the narrative.

It can be a little confusing in places. The point of view switches from present to past, from one character to another, and occasionally, perhaps less convincingly, to the “thinking” of animals in the African bush. The author clearly loves and empathizes with animals – and what exotic animals we encounter here – when compared to the brutality of humans. There are also a number of minor editorial glitches that could easily be put right with a little copy editing.
The important thing is I enjoyed the read. The writing is heart-felt, deeply probing and personal. There is a spiritual, quasi magical quality to it in places, despite the terrible violence. You get the feeling the author has poured her heart and soul into it.
And this one from Saranna who's finally been able to read it properly and not in bits and pieces as an editor. Sorry for pipping you to the post in here muin - I know you've been posting it all over the web Embarrassed

Originally posted by Saranna

It was Dorothy L. Sayers who noted, in ‘Gaudy Night’, the significance of what she called a ‘chance assemblage of persons.’ Who knows what they might talk about?  Who knows what each is privately remembering?
In the ‘present day’ of this debut novel, Jan Hawke exploits the potential of such a gathering to the full. Sophie is our main focus and way into the story, and from the beginning we are aware of her memories of previous times in Africa and the pain and loss she suffered then.  Meanwhile, on the surface, she and her companions are enjoying their safari, chatting about animals they have seen, animals they hope to see, battling scorpions and drinking beer.
Just to make it really hard for herself, however, Jan Hawke then delves back not only into Sophie’s personal African tragedy, but into the memories and sorrows of many other characters, into the violent history of genocide and civil war, into myth and folklore and into the tangling together of some of those stories.
This is a bold venture for a first novel, but Hawke knows how to do it.  The multiple strands of story, the different time-periods, the pain and the happiness, are skilfully brought together so that events and people are solid and four-dimensional, so that the reader can walk into these histories of love and loss and hope and sorrow, and feel as keenly as if they were there.
While reading one is always aware of how solidly founded the story is on Hawke’s knowledge of Africa and her love for it.  All the details that anchor the tale in our own non-fictional world are the fruit, not of targeted research, but of felt conviction. 
This is a book worth reading.  In the flood of available fiction in which we feel we may drown, this is one to seize hold of and keep.  Find it.

The most valuable of all talents is that of never using two words when one
will do ~ Thomas Jefferson
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  Quote Saranna Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 26 Feb 2014 at 9:21am
Thought you saidstars strewn 'no apologies!'  Good to see the numbers growing here! 
Death comes to all
But great achievements raise a monument
Which shall endure until the sun grows cold.
- George Fabricius, 'In Praise of Georgius Agricola'
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  Quote Jano Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 26 Mar 2014 at 11:28pm
Big and sincere thanks to two fellow Dreamers for these two insightful reviews just gone on yesterday/today - is it an omen that they're coming in two by two atm? LOL


Originally posted by Clare O'Beara

Set in Africa, this is not a light read as it contains themes of love, loss and genocide. The Rwandan conflict has been adapted by the author Jan Hawke as a focal point. She sets her tale in an imagined country called Zyanda where one tribe abruptly turns on their peaceful neighbours.

MILELE SAFARI - the African word means eternal - follows Sophie Taylor from England. She revisits the Zambezi River and Victoria Falls in today's calm setting. Memories of learning that her aid-worker fiancé Tom had been killed when he was in the wrong place during 1994's abrupt brutality return to haunt her. Sophie had been pregnant and the shock combined with malaria caused her to miscarry before she returned to England to open a therapy clinic. Today she still cannot come to terms with her trauma.

Other characters surviving violence include a village girl of ten who lets herself be raped in return for food to share with her family. When she is left for dead by her soldier abusers, she is fortunate to be found and brought to an aid station where her wounds are cleaned. She gives herself a new name, Teresa. The Dutch couple who care for her are burnt out from all they have seen and her recovery gives them hope. This girl goes on to become a nun, and an aid worker.

On safari in the modern day, Sophie deals briskly with scorpions and learns about leopards. The friendly voices around her, from the group's guide to people needing the benefit of her experience, help her to come out and face the past. This is not an easy task as there are witnesses and letters to remind her of her soul-wrenching loss.

Predatory animals range from lions to egg-laying flies, while baboons are as dangerous as they wish to be and tourists hoping to spot 'the big five' are warned to stay in their vehicles. Game hunters also tour, underestimating the danger from buffalo. Elephants, rhinos and less exotic creatures are all poached but African countries have come to realise that tourism brings money so animals are somewhat protected. Appalling roads, reluctance to try new farming methods, extreme weather and lack of dietary protein or clean water are just some of the challenges Sophie observes. People from outside the vast continent still throw up their hands and say "This is Africa!"

I was impressed by the attention to detail, the graphic realism (though personally I could have done with fewer retellings of people being hacked to death) and the differing viewpoints. I liked seeing through the eyes of a mother leopard with cubs who had a kill to protect and share with her young, and who wished the two-legged apes would leave her in peace. Brief footnotes help to keep the story flowing as new terms are introduced. I also was pleased to see that the story is ultimately a hopeful one and Sophie begins to relive her life and rediscover love. MILELE SAFARI is Jan Hawke's first novel and I admire the way that she has addressed the challenge of her difficult and absorbing theme.

Other books I have read relating to Africa include: The Poisonwood Bible by Barbara Kingsolver, of a missionary family in the Congo just before the revolution; and The Ukimwi Road a memoir of recent travels by Dervla Murphy. These might be a good lead-in for readers who want to explore but don't wish to read about genocide just yet.

Originally posted by Mary Patterson Thornburg

Dr. Sophie Taylor, a British physician and psychotherapist, has taken a job at a UN-sponsored refugee community in central Africa. Before reporting for work, as a favor to her sister she accompanies a group of filmmakers on a guided safari. During this period she meets an attractive wildlife veterinarian who finds her equally attractive. The couple begins a serious love affair, the veterinarian applies for and gets employment with Sophie's employer, and before long the two become involved in an emergency rescue effort following an earthquake, complicated by a search for a group of elephant poachers.

This, in essence, is the plot of the story presented in "Milele Safari." Yet the story is much deeper and very much darker than such a plot summary suggests.

For this is not Sophie's first trip to Africa, nor her first love affair. And – like the areas she visits now, and like the characters she meets – she is haunted by the tragic events of her earlier experience, which coincided with a widespread genocide.

"Milele Safari" is not in any sense an easy read. It moves steadily from present to past to present again, from the journals and memories of one character to those of another and another. It circles, always, around inexplicable hatreds and unremitting guilt. It does not shrink at shocking truths. At the same time, it never gives way to despair. If you are looking for a conventional thriller, or for a simplistic inspirational "message," you won't find either here.

What you WILL find is a hard look at the complexities of the human spirit, told in terms of modern Africa but pertinent to what has happened and is happening everywhere else in the world. And you'll find characters, situations, and places that will stay with you for a long time.
The most valuable of all talents is that of never using two words when one
will do ~ Thomas Jefferson
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  Quote Saranna Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 27 Mar 2014 at 9:42am
Thumbs Up
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But great achievements raise a monument
Which shall endure until the sun grows cold.
- George Fabricius, 'In Praise of Georgius Agricola'
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  Quote Hoth Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 27 Mar 2014 at 10:52am
Jano, I've read several reviews and now I have to read your novel.  I love Africa.  Is it my imagination but did I see a download opp?
Rerir above Helevorn
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  Quote Jano Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 27 Mar 2014 at 2:36pm
It's in various places but I've updated the top post just now with the Amazon/Kindle links - you can also get it at Barnes & Noble in paperback and coming out in NOOK soonish Wink  

As you can probably tell it's a tale that's hard to pin down genre-wise as I've 'borrowed' from several authors I admire including Kipling ('Just So' stories), Tolkien (Valaquenta), George RR Martin (multiple viewpoint characters), Terry Pratchett (footnotes though not usually humourous) and Frank Herbert and Helen Fielding (quotes or journal excerpts in the chapter headings) so it's a mish-mash of themes that help convey all the contrasts and chaos that contribute to 'how Africa is'. 

I struggled with categorisation when I was putting it on Amazon and various but these reviews are beginning to help me sort this out with an accurate definition - behold Kaleidoscopic FictionLOL
The most valuable of all talents is that of never using two words when one
will do ~ Thomas Jefferson
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  Quote Jano Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 26 Jul 2014 at 2:09pm

Star Star Star Star Star

Originally posted by Jason Stanley

Hope and Human Strength, July 26, 2014 bKelly (Dallas TX)

This review is from: Milele Safari: An Eternal Journey (Kindle Edition)

This is not an easy quick beach read - far from it. However, it is an excellent read. If you have even the slightest interest or curiosity about the complexity of Africa – this is your journey to understanding.

Before writing my review, I read the others - both here on the Kindle edition that I have and on the hard copy - for some reason Amazon has them separated even though they are the same book. The other reviews do a very good job, better than I could, of explaining the detail of the plot and substance of the story. I'll go in a different direction.

This is one of the tightest written books I have read in a very long time. The prose is excellent, the character development equally excellent. One of my pet peeves is when characters are built in one direction then act completely out of character - that never happened, not once, not even with Lyssa the leopard who we get the opportunity to see the world to include tourists from her unique perspective.

I mention Lyssa the leopard because not only does the author give us a rather believable view from the leopards perspective, in doing so she gives us one more angel on the rather amazing story world she develops throughout the book. As with the character development the story world is spot on. You will feel you are there.

This is a book of hope in an often hopeless land. The stories of monstrosities are told with the same excellence and genuineness that supports the characters and story world. I didn't find a single misstep. That is quite an accomplishment for a first time author with such a massive undertaking - this is not a small book or a lightweight topic.

An Eternal Journey is obviously a heart-felt undertaking by the author about a topic that has touched her deeply. If she writes on other topics equally as well, she will become a force in the literary world. I for one hope she continues to exercise her insightful understanding through her keen writing skills.

This is a review 'swap' so in some senses not impartial as this chap is into 'dynamic marketing' in a big way so I'll be reciprocating when his book's ready to hit the stands - but never look a gift review in the mouth! LOL And I think the comments are completely validated but then I would say that wouldn't I? Evil Smile

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  Quote Galen Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 28 Jul 2014 at 2:12pm
Oh bravo Jan!  It looks like all that time you spent pouring over this is paying off.  Congrats!
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  Quote Jano Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 28 Jul 2014 at 5:40pm
Saranna is also responsible for the 'tightly-written' bit with her brilliant editorial eye, so congrats to her too! LOL
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  Quote Galen Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 28 Jul 2014 at 7:39pm
Absolutely.  You could not have had a better editor.
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  Quote Saranna Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 31 Jul 2014 at 5:07pm
Very kind of you both, but it takes a good writer to produce the book first, you know!  That's a great review Jan, and well-deserved.

Cheers flowers
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Which shall endure until the sun grows cold.
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  Quote Jano Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19 Nov 2015 at 6:27pm
And time passes and 'other things' take your attention... Sleepy Since I last posted there's been a lot of water under the bridge and I've joined an online review book club hoping to get some more 'bums on seats' as 'twere. However, there's been a spurt this month as I finally made Book of the Month along with 2 other indie author and... I'm getting a good trickle of reviews coming in and more in the pipeline if my Kindle dashboard is any indicator! Clap

So now's the time to update this page! Roughly in chronological order and including both British and US Amazon reviews.

StarStarStarStar AAfrica; genocide, survival, and hope
ByKenneth J. Kerron August 16, 2014

Jan Hawke has written a fictional story about Africa, its historical tragedies of genocide, and the survivors, both locals and expats. The story is told partially with snippets from the lead character's diary, and partially using the third person narrative. It is not an easy book to read because of the tragic subject matter, and because it deals in detail with the psychological trauma's of the survivors. The author explains that the story parallels events that actually happened in Africa, but places, people, and events have been fictionalized. Ms. Hawke's personal knowledge of Africa, including the tragic genocides and the expat activities as aid workers, educators, medical personnel, and even drivers, and the safari industry allows her to write the story with incredibly detailed descriptions.

It is a powerful story about human tragedy, and the human will to survive and forgive. Ultimately, it is a story of hope, and new beginnings. It is a story about Africa, but unfortunately, the subject is much larger than just Africa. I recommend 'Milele Safari: An Eternal Journey' by Jan Hawke to anyone interested in Africa and/or the struggles of PTSD and other psychological problems. Additionally, it is a suitable read for anyone who is a romantic hopeful.

StarStarStarStarStar
ByFantasy Queenon August 31, 2014

This book isn't my usual sort of read, and given the horror behind the subject matter, I wasn't sure what to expect.
I have to say, that it is well written and incredibly well researched. The book doesn't shy away from the horror of genocide, but neither does it revel in the gory details of what humans can be capable of at their worst.
Through a series of journal-like entries from several different perspectives, we follow a set of characters through different stages of their lives, and see how one horrible event can change their lives forever.
The characters were well developed and well rounded, and as a reader you were able to empathise with both the victims of and the perpetrators of the situation in Hawke's fictional Zyanda.
I highly recommend this book, it was touching and incredibly well written.

StarStarStarStarStar
ByR3on October 20, 2014

If you are looking for a book filled with fast-paced action and adventure on an African safari, this is not the book for you. Although it has all of those things, and beautifully written descriptions of the land and wildlife of Africa, the book is more more thought-provoking. It is a story about the tragedies individuals and nations have suffered. It is a story of genocide, personal loss, despair, grief, acceptance, and forgiveness. You learn about the killing of a nun and Brit from the perspective of all parties involved and how this tragic event affected each of them and those they came in contact with. Don't expect to read this book quickly; it is one you need to contemplate as you go.


ByNancy Bellon December 30, 2014

While not an easy read, this is well worth the emotional gamut the reader experiences. Gritty and sometimes brutal in its reality, it is also a story of hope and survival.


ByB. Martinon February 9, 2015

This was a hard book for me to read. It's well written. The subject matter, though is difficult, and left me feeling uncomfortable through much of it.

But like I said, it's well written and very thought provoking. It's not something you'll finish in a couple of sittings. I did find the story hopped around a bit too much for my liking, but that's a minor quibble. (Reading from the point of view of Lyssa the Leopard was interesting)

If you're not squeamish and you're looking for a title that will make you think, this book is definitely worth picking up.

StarStarStarStarStar
ByJen Jensenon March 31, 2015

This was an powerful book, very lyrical and intense, which affected me long after I finished it. Themes of courage, forgiveness, loss, love and healing play out through the story.

Everything revolves around a horrifying killing in the past, during a genocidal war (fictional, but based partly on Rwanda). The author skillfully takes us from the Englishwoman whose fiancé was killed that day, to the European and African missionaries running the medical clinic, to a teenager tangled up in the killings. We get caught up in their lives back then and as well as now, making us empathize with each through their individual experiences.

It’s not all horror, though – the author obviously has a great love for Africa. The descriptions and every day experiences made me feel like I was there with the wildlife, the dust, the rain. I’m keeping it to re-read next year.

Oh, and I love "TIA" - "This is Africa," the explanation of why things work or don't work as Europeans expect!

StarStarStarStarStar
ByCynboton 6 July 2015

In Jan Hawke's epic story Milele Safari she explores idea that the beauty and brutality of Africa come as a package deal.
Taking us on a journey, we see this world through the eyes of Sophie, who falls in love with Tom, and shares an idyllic moment in time with him in Africa's garden of Eden. Tom later finds himself on the edge of conflict, being at the wrong place at a sensitive time and losses his life trying to protect his friend Teresa.
Jan Hawke demonstrates the contrast between viewing the continent as a tourist, where one has idealistic romantic notions that adventure awaits - to the realistic situations of people who have given their sweat and toil to working for the welfare of the ordinary people of Africa where the picture is very different and where danger and possibly death lurks around every corner.
Jan knows Africa and her love of the place is evident in her description of the Victoria Falls and Kariba Dam and it's surrounds in Zimbabwe. Her glimpse at the elephants taking to the water is a breathlessly beautiful depiction of these magnificent animals.
However she also understands the predicament of innocent people caught up in conflicts not of their making because of the political machinations of cruel despotic government. There is no dressing it up, it exists and rears it's ugly head all over the land.
I read the story as one who was born and brought up in Southern Africa and can only applaud her for her insightful approach.
I would recommend the book to anyone thinking of travelling to Africa because it offers a sense of hope and healing but also makes you aware of the pitfalls.
Sophie is reconciled with her past and finds love where she lost it.

StarStarStarStarStar
ByElessar Bookson June 28, 2015

I started reading this book over a month ago and got so frustrated I had to stop due to professional and personal urgent matters. But the story never left me and this is one of the qualities of a good book, in my opinion.
Yesterday, when I sat down to finish my read it was just as though I had never stopped reading Milele. The characters are so strong and well written, the story is so captivating and strong I hadn’t forgotten any details. Kudos, Jan Hawke!!
As I’m not one to write spoilers, I won’t give away many details but I will say this: fans of complex and realistic characters and layered and deeply moving stories will love this book. But you need to have a strong heart to stomach some bits of the narrative as this isn’t an easy-breezy book. It’s one that will stick with you and maybe haunt you for a while. Don’t you love it when that happens? I do!


ByJoy Nwosu Lo-Bamijokoon July 4, 2015

From the very beginning of this read I knew I was in for a long haul. The foreword went on for ever, followed by the acknowledgment which also went on and on. After these initial chapters, I tried to convince myself that this may be a read for another time when I have nothing else to do, or no other books to read. I even tried to device a new way of tackling very worded reads by reading the book in sections, and at different times, but I knew it will not work. I have never done anything like that before, and wasn’t sure it will work. I knew that if I left it, I may probably never come back to it again. So I decided to go on and see the end of it.

I am happy that I did, because, as the story unfolded, I started to see a pattern of story telling completely new to me, and quite interesting; story telling within a story telling.

The story of war is never a happy story, especially the kind of wars that bordered on genocide. No matter where genocide happened, or in what era in happened, it is always the story of debauchery, depravity, degeneracy, and any other harsh words we can think of. Genocide is never a happy story. It is the story of man’s inhumanity to man, the story of shame both for the victims and the perpetrators. No one as we can see from this story comes out of this experience whole. David is a broken shell of a man, Verity is a scared woman. That experience will stay with them for life.

Sophie was a very courageous woman to have suffered the kind of loss she went through, and still returned to the same scene of her tragedy to work and help the people. This is a very sympathetic view of Africa and her people. This is not the story of Apartheid, but the story of a deep rooted love for Africa and her people. It is a hard read, but a must read.

StarStarStarStarStar
ByKAREN INGALLSon August 18, 2015

What an amazing book with so much historical, social, and geographical information. The characters were strong, well described, and ones I could "see". I learned about the topography, animals, and botany of that area of Africa. Descriptions of the atrocities captured my emotions, the descriptions were sometimes hard to read, but I accepted this is a fact of history. I highly recommend this book.


StarStarStarStarStar
ByMichael Lyneson November 5, 2015

"Milele Safari" by Jan Hawke is wonderful - full stop.

The writing is top notch, with beautiful imagery, scene setting and detailed character description. The dialog is also intricate with distinct points-of-view, unique voices and well defined identifiable personas. Ms Hawke is obviously an accomplished writer and her polished prose shines. My only, (small), critique would be that in some parts of the story the density of the dialog distracts, but as this is basically a story of relationships the dialog is both necessary and a core element.

Milele is an enigmatic story, in the sense that it is not a singular narrative but rather a collection of different stories, woven together in a sort of Chaucerian montage, with various tales telling the same series of events from a different characters' perspective. The characters are interesting as well, from protagonist to antagonist to predator to prey, with Africa itself becoming both the all encompassing world as well as a subtle character and active participant in the progression of the plot.

Our story opens and we are introduced to our heroine, Sophie Taylor, a doctor who is traveling as part of a safari-tourist group to both provide her expert services and to help heal herself through revisiting and confronting ghosts of her past life.
The environs of Africa, Victoria Falls, bring her back to events both euphoric and tragic. Tom, her first love, and the recurring dreams of him and their child become powerful forces that echo and shape her present reality. As Africa re-envelops her and as her journey unfolds we too become enraptured and begin to understand her hurt and how it is reflected and refracted by the prism of her past. No spoilers but this is an engrossing and substantial feast of a tale and there is really something for everyone within it. It is romantic but not romance, adventurous while maintaining intimacy and tragic without being a tragedy. It portrays the range of human frailty and weakness as well as great human strength and resilience.
At the risk of repeating myself, it is just a wonderful work of fiction and I highly recommend it.


Byadam bousteadon 14 November 2015

I loved this book. so mainly subgect a covered:
rape
rascal hatred
love
forgiveness
the problems in Africa

I did not find them alter pull points of vew problem and I loved how the bad man David was shown to be just s a victim as the rest
wunderful descriptions of the land and animals
the onley reason this not five star is because I don't that Quakers would let doctor Doolittle under her hard that eaey fter what she has been threw but then agen what do I know about love

StarStarStarStarStar
ByRebecca Reillyon November 14, 2015

Fabulous Read! I was hesitant to begin because I knew Milele Safari dealt with tough issues and dark times, and I wasn't in the mood for that. I'm so glad I did! Once I started, I could not put the book down. Jan Hawke writes with skill and heart. Milele Safari stirs emotions--grief, humor, hope, and joy. I was so moved by this book, I found myself discussing it with strangers!


ByChristian bousteadon 17 November 2015

A great page turner. Well rounded characters. Particularly enjoyed the part written from the leopards point and was disappointed when there was no more but apart from this loved it.

and... the one 'negative' review, which is actually not that bad really! Smile


StarStarStar Good, but not quite good enough., January 31, 2015
I need to start this with a caveat, for some reason I interpreted the description that I found of the book to suggest I would be reading 
about an alternate Africa, sort of a "how it could have been" story instead of how it is. That being said, because of my interest in African history, 
I think I could have enjoyed the book anyway if it wasn't for just a few problems.

Like has been said before, the writing voice and description is excellent. The biggest issue I had was the way the story jumped from past to present 
and from one point of view to another. I just had a hard time keeping track of where and when I was. It's a heart-wrenching story and one that I think 
needs to be told, but I reached a point where I became frustrated with the viewpoint whiplash and I put the book down.
The characters personalities were definitely consistent and the lion's point of view was interesting, if a bit inconsistent
(the head-hopping thing again). I would pick up another Hawke book, because I think she has a great writing voice, but I might wait until she's published a 
couple more novels and has more experience. I would even be willing to pick this one up again, after some editing.


There are 3 reviews in there that I'm particularly proud of, as they come from people who lived in Africa, including Zimbabwe and Nigeria 
which are both places featured in the book of course. EmbarrassedYahMon
The most valuable of all talents is that of never using two words when one
will do ~ Thomas Jefferson
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  Quote angel7090695001 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 22 Nov 2015 at 8:21pm
Great reviews, Jan. :) It prompts me to take a another glance at Milele Safari.
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  Quote Saranna Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 23 Nov 2015 at 10:43am
Yep - all of this is only what the book deserves (except the negative one of course!)  Congratulations again Jan on a terrific novel.  

PS how can people who have presumably grown up with modern films and TV find POV shifts difficult????
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But great achievements raise a monument
Which shall endure until the sun grows cold.
- George Fabricius, 'In Praise of Georgius Agricola'
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